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Behavioral Skills Training (BST): Step-by-Step Guide to Unleashing Full Potential

Behavioral Skills Training (BST) is an evidence-based training method that aims to teach individuals new skills using a systematic approach. This training technique has been widely applied in various settings, such as education, healthcare, and workplace environments. BST is now widely used in ABA practices and is recognized as one of the best ways to train staff, parents and non-ABA professionals how to use ABA interventions.

BST includes 4 basic steps including providing clear instructions, modeling desired behaviors, offering practice opportunities and providing feedback for trainees. Research has demonstrated the effectiveness of BST in improving performance across a range of settings and target audiences. From training teachers to implement behavioral momentum, to caregiver implementations of the Premack Principle, BST has shown positive results when used correctly.

Implementing BST can be tailored to suit different scenarios and individual needs, making it a versatile and adaptable approach. It is essential to evaluate the effectiveness of the training and continuously refine the process based on feedback and outcomes to achieve the desired results.

Key Takeaways

  • Behavioral Skills Training is a versatile, evidence-based method for teaching new skills.
  • Components of BST include clear instructions, modeling, feedback, and practice opportunities.
  • BST has shown positive results across various settings and target audiences.

Contents

Understanding Behavioral Skills Training
Steps for Implementing BST
-Instruction
-Modeling
-Rehearsal
-Feedback
Benefits and Applications of BST
Ethical Considerations Related to BST
Research Related to BST
References and Related Reading

Understanding Behavioral Skills Training

Behavioral Skills Training (BST) is a proven and effective method for teaching new behaviors and skills to individuals, and is especially good for staff and parent training. This training method comprises various components that work together to help learners achieve mastery in a specific skill or behavior.

BST allows you to systematically teach a wide range of skills to a variety of learners. This teaching method is especially helpful for teaching staff and parents to implement behavioral interventions or to use strategies included in a learner’s skill acquisition program. This significantly improves the accuracy of implementation and the outcomes for your learners.

BST involves 4 specific steps such as:

  1. Instruction: The trainer provides a clear and concise explanation of the desired behavior or skill to the learner.
  2. Modeling: The trainer demonstrates the correct way to perform the desired skill or behavior, allowing the learner to observe and understand the expectations.
  3. Rehearsal: The learner practices the skill or behavior, receiving guidance and support from the trainer.
  4. Feedback: The trainer provides constructive feedback on the learner’s performance, pointing out areas that need improvement and reinforcing aspects done well.
4 steps of behavioral skills training (BST): Instruction, modeling, rehearsal, feedback

To achieve mastery in BST, trainers often utilize several training techniques, including:

  • Task analysis: Breaking down complex skills or behaviors into smaller, manageable steps.
  • Shaping: Gradually modifying and refining a learner’s behavior through positive reinforcement.
  • Prompting: Providing cues or assistance to guide the learner in performing the desired behavior.
  • Chaining: Teaching the individual steps of a sequence and then combining them to perform the complete skill or behavior.

These are the same skill acquisition techniques you use with your autistic learners. These are simply highly effective teaching strategies and not tools that are only effective with neurodiverse learners. This training method’s effectiveness lies in its structured process and ongoing support, ensuring each learner has the opportunity to achieve their full potential.

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Steps for Implementing BST

Behavioral Skills Training (BST) is an effective teaching method used to provide training for various skills. There are four critical steps that contribute to its success: Instruction, Modeling, Rehearsal, and Feedback.

Instruction

When implementing BST, the first step is to provide clear and concise instructions to the trainee. These instructions should explain the targeted behavior or skill, its importance, and the steps required for its execution.

  • Ensure instructions are easy to understand
  • Use examples when possible
  • Break down complex behaviors into smaller tasks

Offering comprehensive instructions helps the trainee gain an initial understanding of the skill, setting the foundation for the following components.

Here’s an example:

You have decided to use Functional Communication Training (FCT) with one of your learners, Kevin. The RBT who has been assigned to the case has never implemented the protocol to teach FCT. You arrange to meet with her 30 minutes before her next session to begin training. During this time, you teach her about FCT. You:

  1. Tell her that this intervention is designed to help Kevin learn to use communication to get what he wants rather than using target behavior. Kevin engages in aggression because he wants access to his iPad but also because he doesn’t want to do the things he is asked to do. FCT will teach Kevin that he can get his iPad and escape the tasks by using his words to communicate what he wants. You use language that’s easy for the RBT to understand.
  2. Next, you provide examples of different situations where Kevin could use communication rather than aggression to get what he wants. You provide examples of how it has helped other learners and talk about how you were able to help the learners gradually increase their tolerance of demands over time, which is your plan for Kevin.
  3. You review the steps of teaching FCT:
    • Create an opportunity to practice by presenting the demand (prompt him to transition from the iPad to a non-preferred task.
    • Immediately prompt Kevin to provide the communicative response, “more time.”
    • Reinforce any approximation of this response immediately by removing the demand and allowing him to continue with the iPad.
    • Gradually introduce a delay to reinforcement by requiring he complete a simple task like giving you a high-five or thumbs up before giving him access to the iPad and removing the demand.
  4. Let the RBT know that you will be available to answer questions and help to problem solve as she goes through the process.

The instruction step should include reviewing the documentation in the behavior intervention plan (BIP) and/or the skill acquisition plan so the trainee (i.e. RBT, parent, or non-ABA professional) can refer back to these instructions.

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Modeling

Modeling involves demonstrating the targeted behavior to the trainee. This demonstration can be performed by the trainer or through videos or other resources. The goal is to show the trainee the correct execution of the desired behavior.

  • Highlight each step of the behavior during the demonstration
  • Address potential difficulties the trainee may encounter
  • Encourage the trainee to ask questions for clarification

Let’s continue with the example from above:

  1. You find a really good YouTube video that shows staff teaching FCT to a learner similar to Kevin. You pause the video to highlight each of the steps.
  2. You discuss the challenges you anticipate when she teaches Kevin to use FCT, including the fact that he might engage in aggression before she has time to give him back his iPad or that he might refuse to use the communicative response you decide to teach.
  3. You give the RBT an opportunity to ask questions and take the time to answer them thoughtfully.

Rather than using a YouTube video as a model, you can also demonstrate how to use the skill with the RBT playing the role of the learner and you playing the role of the RBT. Begin by slowly going through each of the steps, then asking the RBT to provide one of the challenges you anticipate the learner to present.

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Rehearsal

Rehearsal is a crucial component of BST, as it gives the trainee the opportunity to practice the learned behavior. This process often involves role-play situations where the trainee can apply the newly acquired skill in a controlled environment.

  • Provide opportunities for repeated practice
  • Offer guidance and support during rehearsals
  • Encourage self-monitoring and self-evaluation

Let’s continue the example from earlier:

  1. After reviewing the YouTube video and answering the RBT’s questions, you create an opportunity for her to practice by participating in a role-play where you act as the learner. You begin by cooperatively communicating when prompted to do so by the RBT, but then add some challenging situations that might come up in real-life situations with Kevin.
  2. During this practice, you prompt the RBT through many of the steps, fading prompts as she becomes more comfortable with the protocol.
  3. You provide her with a fidelity checklist so she can monitor her own application of FCT during sessions and refer to it if she needs a reminder of the steps. You let her know that during the upcoming session, you will also use the checklist to provide feedback.

As with our learners, staff, parents, and non-ABA professionals often appreciate errorless learning. If you tell your trainee before beginning the Rehearsal phase of BST that you plan to walk them through each of the steps as they go, it’s likely to feel less intimidating and awkward to go through the steps. Fade this level of support until the trainee is able to perform the skill on their own.

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Feedback

Lastly, providing feedback is critical to the growth and development of the trainee’s skills. The trainer should assess the trainee’s performance during rehearsal, identifying areas of strength and areas that need improvement. The trainee should have an opportunity to practice the skill with a learner as soon after the rehearsal phase as possible. The trainer should provide concrete, objective feedback.

  • Offer immediate and specific feedback
  • Balance positive reinforcement with constructive criticism
  • Use feedback to inform further instruction and modeling

Incorporating these components into BST ensures a comprehensive learning experience that can effectively teach various skills and behaviors. By following these steps methodically, trainers can help trainees become confident and proficient in their newfound abilities.

Let’s finish out the example we have been using:

  1. Immediately after the RBT finishes rehearsing implementing FCT, it’s time to start the session with Kevin. You remind her to place the fidelity checklist on the table near where he is sitting with his iPad. You also remind her that she can reference it if she needs a reminder of the steps. You let her know that you’re there to help her out if she gets stuck and it’s natural for this to feel a little awkward at first. You’re available to provide some tips and tricks to help this go more smoothly.
  2. You unobtrusively observe the RBT as she presents the demand to Kevin. She prompts the communicative response immediately after presenting the demand, but Kevin pushed her away rather than using words. Although you practiced this scenario, the RBT struggles to remember how to respond. You discretely remind her of what she should do. When she does, Kevin responds by saying he wants more time. She reinforces the communication by giving him more time which is in line with the protocol.
  3. You record the data in your fidelity checklist and you ask the RBT to do the same while Kevin is engaged with his iPad. You compare your checklist to the one the RBT completed and you both recorded the same data. You point out the things the RBT did really well, including how she accurately recorded the data on the fidelity checklist. You review the step she struggled with and asked if she had questions or wanted to practice more. She said she felt confident now but wanted another opportunity to try it with Kevin.
  4. Following the 3 extra minutes Kevin was allowed according to the protocol, the RBT again presented him with the demand to put the iPad away. This time when he pushed her away, she followed the protocol.

We are often taught to use the “feedback sandwich” when providing feedback. The intention is to make the feedback more tolerable to the trainee. There are many challenges with this method of feedback, including the fact that it’s unclear to the trainee whether you approve of their performance or not.

Our CEU course discusses why the feedback sandwich is not the best method of providing feedback and offers an alternative that utilizes the ACT matrix. Using this approach, you and the trainee work toward a shared purpose: the success of the learner. Since you share the same goal, feedback is more tolerable.

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Benefits and Applications of BST

Behavioral Skills Training (BST) is a well-established and evidence-based method for teaching a variety of skills and behaviors. It combines several learning strategies, such as instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback, to help individuals acquire and refine their abilities. This technique is widely used in various settings and has several benefits.

  • Efficiency and Effectiveness: BST is known for its efficient approach to teaching new skills. By breaking down complex tasks into smaller components and incorporating practice and feedback, individuals can quickly grasp essential concepts and improve their performance.
  • Flexible Application: BST can be adapted to suit different learning styles and settings. It can be implemented using various methods, including verbal instruction, video modeling, and practical demonstrations. This adaptability allows for tailored training experiences that cater to individual needs and preferences.
  • Application to Diverse Populations: Research has shown that BST is beneficial for a range of populations, such as teaching safety skills to autistic children and helping graduate students utilize ABA techniques.
  • Enhancements with Technology: Advancements in technology have enabled new applications of BST, such as virtual reality training. Virtual reality allows for immersive and engaging training experiences, as demonstrated in a study on teaching a verbal mathematical questioning strategy.

Some notable applications of BST include:

  • Mental Health: BST has been employed to train therapists and clinicians in the delivery of cognitive-behavioral interventions for mental health disorders like anxiety and depression.
  • Education: Teachers can be trained using BST to effectively implement classroom management strategies, such as the Good Behavior Game, which has been shown to improve implementation adherence and overall quality.
  • Safety Skills: BST has been used to teach street-crossing skills to autistic children and adolescents.

In summary, Behavioral Skills Training is a valuable and versatile approach to skill acquisition and improvement. It effectively balances theory and practice, optimizing learning experiences through tailored training and feedback. The flexibility and adaptability of BST make it an excellent choice for training in various fields and populations.

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Ethical Considerations Related to BST

Ethical ConcernDescriptionAction Steps
Informed ConsentParticipants in behavioral skills training should be fully informed about the purpose, procedures, risks, and benefits of the training.Obtain written informed consent from all participants before starting the training. Provide clear and comprehensive information about the training process and potential outcomes.
Privacy and ConfidentialityDuring the training, participants may share personal or sensitive information. Ensuring privacy and confidentiality is essential.Implement secure data storage and access protocols. Clearly communicate confidentiality measures to participants. Obtain permission to use any training materials or videos for educational purposes.
Competence and QualificationsOnly qualified and competent trainers should conduct behavioral skills training. Participants should receive instruction from knowledgeable professionals.Ensure that trainers possess appropriate qualifications, experience, and expertise in ABA. Verify their credentials and expertise in delivering behavioral skills training.
Avoiding Dual RelationshipsTrainers must maintain professional boundaries and avoid engaging in dual relationships with participants, ensuring objectivity and avoiding conflicts of interest.Clarify the professional roles and boundaries of the trainers. Refrain from engaging in any personal, financial, or other relationships with the participants that could compromise the training process.
Cultural Sensitivity and DiversityBehavioral skills training should be sensitive to diverse cultural backgrounds, values, and beliefs to avoid imposing culturally inappropriate practices.Incorporate cultural sensitivity and diversity training for trainers. Tailor the training content to be inclusive and adaptable to participants from different cultural backgrounds.
Consent for Video Recording and Use of Training ContentVideo recording during training can be beneficial for skill assessment and feedback. However, obtaining consent is crucial before recording or using these videos.Obtain explicit consent from participants before video recording any training sessions. Clearly outline the purpose of recording, the extent of its use, and how it will benefit the participants.
Avoiding Coercion and PunishmentThe use of coercion or punishment during behavioral skills training is unethical and should be strictly avoided.Emphasize positive reinforcement and evidence-based teaching methods. Train participants in using positive reinforcement techniques effectively and ethically.
Monitoring and Evaluating Training EffectivenessRegularly assessing the effectiveness of the training is crucial to ensure its impact and make necessary improvements.Implement pre- and post-training assessments to measure skill acquisition. Solicit feedback from participants to gauge their satisfaction with the training and identify areas for improvement.
Generalization of SkillsParticipants should be encouraged to generalize their acquired skills to real-life settings, promoting functional and meaningful outcomes.Incorporate generalization training as part of the skills training. Provide opportunities for participants to practice skills in various settings to enhance their applicability.
Ongoing Professional DevelopmentEthical practice involves a commitment to continuous learning and professional growth.Encourage participants to engage in ongoing professional development opportunities, such as workshops, seminars, and conferences, to enhance their ABA knowledge and skills.

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Research Related to BST

TitleSummaryAction Steps
A comparison of immediate and post-session feedback with behavioral skills training to improve interview skills in college studentsThe article explores a study comparing the effectiveness of immediate and post-session feedback combined with behavioral skills training to enhance interview skills in college students. Both feedback methods showed improvement in interview skills, but the immediate feedback group demonstrated more significant gains. This suggests that providing feedback during the training session might be more effective for improving interview performance in college students.Consider incorporating immediate feedback during interview skills training sessions to enhance performance. Assess the effectiveness of different feedback methods in other training contexts.
Guidelines for using behavioral skills training to provide teacher supportThe article presents guidelines for using behavioral skills training (BST) to offer support to teachers. BST is a valuable tool for improving teacher skills and increasing student outcomes. The guidelines include defining target behaviors, providing clear instructions, using role-playing scenarios, and utilizing feedback effectively. By following these guidelines, educators can enhance their teaching abilities and positively impact student performance.Educators should identify specific target behaviors they want to improve and apply BST techniques accordingly. Create role-playing scenarios to simulate teaching situations and practice desired skills. Offer constructive feedback to teachers to reinforce positive changes in their teaching methods.
Parent-implemented behavioral skills training of social skillsThe article discusses the effectiveness of parent-implemented behavioral skills training (BST) for teaching social skills to children. The study found that parents can effectively implement BST to teach social skills to their children, leading to improved social behavior. Parental involvement in BST can be a powerful way to promote positive social development in children.Encourage parents to participate actively in the social skills training of their children. Provide clear instructions and guidance on implementing BST techniques at home. Monitor progress and provide feedback to parents to reinforce effective practices.
Using behavioral skills training to teach parents to implement three-step prompting: A component analysis and generalization assessmentThe article investigates the use of behavioral skills training (BST) to teach parents to implement three-step prompting with their children. BST proved effective in teaching parents this skill, and they were able to generalize it to new situations. BST can be a valuable tool for training parents in specific techniques to support their children’s development.Offer parents individualized training sessions to focus on their specific needs and challenges. Assess generalization of skills to ensure parents can apply the learned techniques in different situations. Provide ongoing support and feedback to parents to maintain their competence in implementing three-step prompting.
Using virtual reality enhanced behavioral skills training to teach street-crossing skills to children and adolescents with autism spectrum disordersThe article explores the use of virtual reality-enhanced behavioral skills training (VR-BST) to teach street-crossing skills to children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. The study shows that VR-BST can be effective in enhancing the safety skills of individuals with autism in real-world situations. The integration of virtual reality can provide a novel and immersive training experience.Consider incorporating virtual reality technology in training programs for individuals with autism. Explore other potential applications of VR-BST in teaching safety skills and real-world behaviors.
Exploring the efficacy of behavioral skills training to teach basic behavior analytic techniques to oral care providersThe article examines the efficacy of behavioral skills training (BST) for teaching basic behavior analytic techniques to oral care providers. The study demonstrates that BST is effective in training oral care providers in behavior analytic techniques. BST can be beneficial for teaching a wide range of skills to professionals in various domains.Apply BST to train professionals in different fields on specific behavior analytic techniques. Tailor the training to the needs and responsibilities of the targeted professionals. Evaluate the effectiveness of BST in other areas of skill development among professionals.
The use of behavioral skills training and in situ feedback to protect children with autism from abduction luresThe article discusses the use of behavioral skills training (BST) combined with in situ feedback to protect children with autism from abduction lures. The study demonstrates that BST and in situ feedback can effectively teach children to respond appropriately to dangerous situations. This approach can be crucial for safeguarding children with autism from potential threats.Implement BST and in situ feedback in safety training programs for children with autism. Adapt the training to address other potential dangers and teach children appropriate responses. Continually reinforce and review safety skills to ensure children retain the learned behaviors.
Behavioral skills training for graduate students providing cognitive behavior therapy to children with autism spectrum disorderThe article focuses on behavioral skills training (BST) for graduate students who provide cognitive behavior therapy to children with autism spectrum disorder. BST can enhance the therapeutic skills of graduate students and improve outcomes for children with autism spectrum disorder.Incorporate BST into the training curriculum for graduate students learning to provide therapy to children with autism spectrum disorder. Evaluate the impact of BST on therapy outcomes and the students’ confidence in delivering effective treatments.
Evaluating the use of behavioral skills training to improve school staffs’ implementation of behavior intervention plansThe article evaluates the use of behavioral skills training (BST) to improve school staff’s implementation of behavior intervention plans. BST was effective in enhancing staff competence and fidelity in implementing behavior intervention plans, leading to better outcomes for students. The study highlights the value of BST in educational settings.Implement BST as a training approach to improve staff’s implementation of behavior intervention plans. Provide ongoing support and feedback to staff to ensure continued success. Assess the impact of BST on student behavior and educational outcomes.
Establishing fire safety skills using behavioral skills trainingThe article discusses the use of behavioral skills training (BST) to establish fire safety skills in individuals. BST was effective in teaching fire safety skills, and participants maintained the acquired skills over time. BST can be valuable for teaching essential safety skills in various populations.Apply BST to teach other safety skills and behaviors to different target populations. Develop customized BST protocols for specific safety-related goals. Continually reinforce and review safety skills to ensure retention and generalization.
Use of behavioral skills training with teachers: A systematic reviewThe article presents a systematic review of the use of behavioral skills training (BST) with teachers. The review highlights the effectiveness of BST in improving teacher performance and student outcomes. BST is a valuable tool for enhancing teaching practices and fostering a positive learning environment.Promote the adoption of BST in teacher training and professional development programs. Evaluate the impact of BST on teacher effectiveness and student performance in various educational settings.
A component analysis of a behavioral skills training package used to teach conversation skills to young adults with autism spectrum and other developmental disordersThe article conducts a component analysis of a behavioral skills training (BST) package for teaching conversation skills to young adults with autism spectrum and other developmental disorders. The study identifies essential components of BST that contribute to the effectiveness of the intervention. BST can be tailored to teach different social skills to individuals with developmental disorders.Utilize component analysis to identify the critical elements of BST for specific skill training. Customize BST protocols to target different social skills and communication abilities in individuals with developmental disorders. Evaluate the generalization of conversation skills learned through BST to various social situations.
Using acceptance and commitment training to enhance the effectiveness of behavioral skills trainingThe article explores using acceptance and commitment training (ACT) to enhance the effectiveness of behavioral skills training (BST). ACT is combined with BST to improve participants’ ability to apply the learned skills in challenging situations. Integrating ACT with BST can lead to more robust and long-lasting behavior change.Consider combining ACT with BST in training programs to foster greater skill generalization and persistence. Assess the impact of the integrated approach on long-term behavior change and skill application.
The effects of behavioral skills training on caregiver implementation of guided complianceThe article examines the effects of behavioral skills training (BST) on caregiver implementation of guided compliance with children. BST proved effective in teaching caregivers to implement guided compliance, leading to improved child behavior. BST can be valuable for teaching caregivers various behavior management techniques.Use BST to train caregivers in implementing different behavior management strategies effectively. Provide ongoing support and feedback to caregivers to ensure the maintenance of improved child behavior.
Effectiveness of behavioral skills training on staff performance in a job training setting for high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disordersThe article assesses the effectiveness of behavioral skills training (BST) on staff performance in a job training setting for high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. BST improved staff performance in teaching job-related skills to individuals with autism. BST can be instrumental in supporting vocational training for individuals with autism.Implement BST in job training settings to enhance staff competence in working with individuals with autism. Customize BST protocols to address the specific vocational needs of each individual. Evaluate the impact of BST on the acquisition and maintenance of job-related skills in individuals with autism.
Teaching practitioners to conduct behavioral skills training: A pyramidal approach for training multiple human service staffThe article presents a pyramidal approach for training multiple human service staff to conduct behavioral skills training (BST). This approach allows for efficient training of a large number of staff members and promotes consistent implementation of BST. The pyramidal training model is an effective way to disseminate training across organizations.Implement the pyramidal approach to efficiently train multiple staff members in BST techniques. Develop a structured training program that cascades knowledge and skills through the organization. Continuously monitor and assess staff performance to ensure the fidelity of BST implementation.
The effects of behavioral skills training on implementation of the picture exchange communication systemThe article investigates the effects of behavioral skills training (BST) on the implementation of the picture exchange communication system (PECS). BST proved effective in teaching staff to implement PECS accurately. BST can be valuable for training staff in various communication systems for individuals with communication difficulties.Use BST to train staff in the accurate implementation of other communication systems for individuals with communication challenges. Provide ongoing support and feedback to staff to ensure the successful use of the trained communication techniques.
The effects of behavioral skills training on staff implementation of discrete‐trial teachingThe article examines the effects of behavioral skills training (BST) on staff implementation of discrete-trial teaching (DTT). BST was effective in improving staff competence in implementing DTT with students. BST can be valuable for training staff in various instructional methods for individuals with disabilities.Use BST to train staff in implementing other evidence-based instructional techniques. Customize BST to target the specific instructional needs of each staff member. Evaluate the impact of BST on student learning outcomes and staff performance.
Evaluation of behavioral skills training for teaching functional assessment and treatment selection skills to parentsThe article evaluates the effectiveness of behavioral skills training (BST) for teaching parents functional assessment and treatment selection skills. BST proved effective in improving parents’ abilities to conduct functional assessments and select appropriate treatments. BST can be valuable for training parents in behavior analysis techniques to support their children.Utilize BST to train parents in various behavior analysis techniques and strategies. Offer ongoing support and supervision to parents to ensure the successful application of learned skills. Assess the impact of BST on child behavior and the parents’ competence in conducting functional assessments.
Training direct-care staff to provide communication intervention to adults with intellectual disability: A systematic reviewThe article presents a systematic review of training direct-care staff to provide communication intervention to adults with intellectual disability. Behavioral skills training (BST) is a valuable approach for improving direct-care staff’s ability to support individuals with communication difficulties.Implement BST in training programs for direct-care staff working with individuals with intellectual disabilities. Customize BST protocols to address the specific communication needs of each individual. Evaluate the impact of BST on the communication abilities and quality of life of adults with intellectual disabilities.
Component analysis of behavior skills training in functional analysisThe article conducts a component analysis of behavior skills training (BST) in functional analysis. The study identifies essential components of BST that contribute to the effectiveness of functional analysis training. BST can be tailored and optimized for training professionals in functional analysis techniques.Utilize component analysis to identify the critical elements of BST for training professionals in functional analysis. Customize BST protocols to focus on the specific skills and competencies required for functional analysis. Evaluate the impact of BST on the professional’s ability to conduct functional analysis effectively.

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References and Related Reading

Barker, L. K., Moore, J. W., Olmi, D. J., & Rowsey, K. (2019). A comparison of immediate and post-session feedback with behavioral skills training to improve interview skills in college students. Journal of organizational behavior management39(3-4), 145-163.

DiGennaro Reed, F. D., Blackman, A. L., Erath, T. G., Brand, D., & Novak, M. D. (2018). Guidelines for using behavioral skills training to provide teacher support. Teaching Exceptional Children50(6), 373-380.

Dogan, R. K., King, M. L., Fischetti, A. T., Lake, C. M., Mathews, T. L., & Warzak, W. J. (2017). Parent‐implemented behavioral skills training of social skills. Journal of applied behavior analysis50(4), 805-818.

Driftke, M. A., Tiger, J. H., & Wierzba, B. C. (2017). Using behavioral skills training to teach parents to implement three-step prompting: A component analysis and generalization assessment. Learning and Motivation, 57, 1–14. https://doi.org/10.1016%2Fj.lmot.2016.12.001.

Goldsmith, T. R. (2008). Using virtual reality enhanced behavioral skills training to teach street -crossing skills to children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (Order No. 3323523). Available from Psychology Database. (304448424). Retrieved from https://www.proquest.com/dissertations-theses/using-virtual-reality-enhanced-behavioral-skills/docview/304448424/se-2.

Graudins, M. M., Rehfeldt, R. A., DeMattei, R., Baker, J. C., & Scaglia, F. (2012). Exploring the efficacy of behavioral skills training to teach basic behavior analytic techniques to oral care providers. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 6, 978–987. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rasd.2011.12.010.

Gunby, K. V., & Rapp, J. T. (2014). The use of behavioral skills training and in situ feedback to protect children with autism from abduction lures. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 47, 856–860. https://doi.org/10.1002/jaba.173.

Hassan, M., Thomson, K. M., Khan, M., Burnham Riosa, P., & Weiss, J. A. (2017). Behavioral skills training for graduate students providing cognitive behavior therapy to children with autism spectrum disorder. Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice17(2), 155.

Hogan, A., Knez, N., & Kahng, S. (2015). Evaluating the use of behavioral skills training to improve school staffs’ implementation of behavior intervention plans. Journal of Behavioral Education24, 242-254.

Houvouras, A. J., & Harvey, M. T. (2014). Establishing fire safety skills using behavioral skills training. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 47, 420–424. https://doi.org/10.1002/jaba.113.

Kirkpatrick, M., Akers, J., & Rivera, G. (2019). Use of behavioral skills training with teachers: A systematic review. Journal of Behavioral Education28, 344-361.

Kornack, L. T., Ringdahl, J. E., Sjostrom, A., & Neurnberger, J. E. (2013). A component analysis of a behavioral skills training package used to teach conversation skills to young adults with autism spectrum and other developmental disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 7, 1370–1376. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rasd.2013.07.012.

Little, A., Tarbox, J., & Alzaabi, K. (2020). Using acceptance and commitment training to enhance the effectiveness of behavioral skills training. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science16, 9-16.

Miles, N. I., & Wilder, D. A. (2009). The effects of behavioral skills training on caregiver implementation of guided compliance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis42(2), 405-410.

Palmen, A., Didden, R., & Korzilius, H. (2010). Effectiveness of behavioral skills training on staff performance in a job training setting for high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders4(4), 731-740.

Parsons, M. B., Rollyson, J. H., & Reid, D. H. (2013). Teaching practitioners to conduct behavioral skills training: A pyramidal approach for training multiple human service staff. Behavior analysis in practice6, 4-16.

Rosales, R., Stone, K., & Rehfeldt, R. A. (2009). The effects of behavioral skills training on implementation of the picture exchange communication system. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis42(3), 541-549.

Sarokoff, R. A., & Sturmey, P. (2004). The effects of behavioral skills training on staff implementation of discrete‐trial teaching. Journal of applied behavior analysis37(4), 535-538.

Shayne, R., & Miltenberger, R. G. (2013). Evaluation of behavioral skills training for teaching functional assessment and treatment selection skills to parents. Behavioral Interventions28(1), 4-21.

van der Meer, L., Matthews, T., Ogilvie, E., Berry, A., Waddington, H., Balandin, S., & Sigafoos, J. (2017). Training direct-care staff to provide communication intervention to adults with intellectual disability: A systematic review. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 26, 1279–1295. https://doi.org/10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0125.

Ward, H. J., & Sturmey, P. (2012). Component analysis of behavior skills training in functional analysis. Behavioral Interventions, 272, 75–92. https://doi.org/10.1002/bin.1339.

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